Sunday, June 8, 2008

 Since we returned from our trip and every day has been spent in the garden trying to regain some sense of order. It is not easy for me to pull out plants that are still in flower but the Coreopsis, Gaillardia and Salvias had taken over and I was beginning to wonder what exactly might be growing underneath. There is still more to come but now I can see the structure of the garden once again. The mullein has put on a splendid display but its presence in the garden is fast drawing to a close. It produces thousands of seeds.


The California poppies are still blooming, albeit with smaller flowers but they surround the Agave with a sea of yellow.


Bergarten sage should be a standard in every Texas garden. It performs well under hot dry conditions and adds a blue grey hue to the planting.


In the English garden the purple coneflower has re seeded along the dry stack wall. 


I am only just realizing how much I rely on those hardy annuals like cosmos and blanket flower. Here they are again to add color to the garden.



I think I'll just sit outside on the patio this evening and enjoy "The Glory of the Garden"

9 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh--I'm sorry I haven't been keeping up, mostly because I'm planning a big upcoming holiday. Is this your backyard garden? I think it's GORGEOUS!

    I haven't seen any more of the nymph stinkbugs/harlequins since I so dramatically DUNKED that one batch. Maybe some of their buddies were watching...

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  2. hank-you for your kind comment. I wish I could say the same about the harlequins and Leaf footeds. Unfortunately they just went rampant while I was gone. I must have killed 50 today-nymphs. All I can say is that every one I kill is 500 less by next week!
    Jenny

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  3. Jenny - after reading your comment the other day, I decided to follow your example. I caught a few nymphs and did the pinch, hoping to start small and work up to the adult Leaf-foots.

    It's fun to see your lovely garden in a different phase from the April tour. Much of our back yard is in shade, but I'm also appreciating the coneflowers in the sunny front. I don't know Bergarten sage but think I may need some!

    Annie at the Transplantable Rose

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  4. Thanks for visiting my blog. I'm glad to hear it may be some help to your son. Your garden is lovely. I was surprised to see you are in Texas--I was expecting to see an English location based on your Lancashire Rose name!
    Cheers,
    Aiyana

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  5. Annie-I have no idea how to get those little guys into water. I don't have any problem squishing bugs and can even do the big grasshoppers! It's all out war against the bad bugs in my garden.

    Aiyana-I'll be keeping a watch on your site. As for my name- I was born in Lancashire and should have used Lancashire lass but thought rose was more appropriate for a garden blog!
    Jenny

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  6. Thanks for stopping by my Garden Wise Guy blog and for your compliments. I enjoy taking a humorous approach to my writing.

    This is my first time at your blog and I love the recent shots of your garden, especially the "sprinkles" of this and that along the paths and walls. You've got a great eye for design!

    I'll post a link to your site sometime today. Gotta share the good stuff with everyone!

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  7. Thank-you, garden wise guy, for you compliments. I was feeling some despair after being away for 4 weeks. Particularly as I was in England and came back with hoards of ideas for the garden, only to be faced with 100 degrees day after day.
    Jenny

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  8. Ooh, what is this Bergarten sage? I've somehow never heard of this plant with big, beautiful, blue-green leaves that will take full sun and our summer drought--can this be true? Where did you get it?

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  9. I have had this in my garden for years. It grows and roots as it goes so at the end of the year I always have new plants to move to other parts of the garden. I cut it back hard in the spring. I'm sure it is available in the herb section at most nurseries.
    Jenny

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