Sunday, October 23, 2011

AM I CRAZY OR WHAT?


Today, after our walk, we went to Whole Foods for our usual taco breakfast/lunch. In the fish department, what did I see but a poor ladybug. Poor thing probably came in with the flowers. It's going home with me. What to put it in? Ah! I have the two paper plates (clean) and the 3 lidded salsa cups and a fork and spoon that I am carrying in a bag, from our lunch ( recycler extraordinaire). I scooped up the ladybug into the bag for the  ride home. Having ascertained that it was not the dreaded Asian lady beetle, I set it free in the garden. I haven't seen an aphid in the garden all summer so I hope it is getting ready to hibernate.


Another sign of madness in a gardener is allowing a poke weed to grow in the garden. I am fascinated by the flowers and berries and the mocking bird adores them. He has already set up winter camp here. I always wonder if it is the same bird year after. He sleeps in the Lady Banks' rose and flies out with a screech when we have visitors who leave late, in the dark. He is on a good thing with all the chile pequin, yaupon and those delicious poke weed berries. Crazy lady, but someone loves me!

14 comments:

  1. Crazy like a fox! That poke weed is very cool. Love the magenta berries. Looks like a happy home for all sorts of birds, mocking, lady and otherwise.

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  2. So sweet that you went into rescue mode and helped that little ladybug. I really like the poke weed berries. I'm sure the happy mockingbird is an added bonus.

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  3. Rose, Guessing you have never seen these by the thousands before. They can cover up the walls and door jambs when they explode in population. Your story hit home as this morning I found a big katydid eating from our vase of lilies in the kitchen.

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  4. I vote - Not crazy. Love the ladybug story.

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  5. caroline- I have another pokeweed growing behind the citrus. Probably will have a lot more next year.
    Rambling wren- I agree, the color is amazing, although the mocking bird is not too careful where he poops!
    Randy- I have heard of that and have seen those traps but it never happens around here. We just killed a stink bug in the house. Must have come in on the amaranth!
    Cottage dome- Do you know that those little devils bite. Not the one today but I have been nipped by them before now.

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  6. Poke is indeed a weed in Northeastern Kansas, but I like it just as much as you do, Rose. I have several clumps that I have been lightly tending in the wilder areas of the garden for the past five years. One is over 10 feet tall with an equal spread--one of the most commented-upon plants in the yard. Birds love the fruit, and the golden fall color lights up the shady spots. The young shoots are edible in Spring, and said to be delicious--though dangerous in excess (as with most things in life.) I'll try some "poke sallit" next April. As always, its a pleasure to visit your garden, Rose.

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  7. How sweet about the Ladybug! I let a Pokeweed go to see last year in my backyard and eek...this year millions of seedlings! I swear, every single seed my have germinated! I'll cross my fingers yours isn't quite so "generous" :-)

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  8. I love the thought of you relocating the ladybug...I vote "not crazy"!!

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  9. No, you're not crazy. I'd take a ladybug home as well...and try to find it some aphids to boot.
    I love pokeweed and I have tried to get it to grow in the garden but to no avail. Last year I had a number of volunteers, but not so this year. That's funny about that mockingbird. Since they are VERY territorial, I would guess it is the same one. We have one that 'owns' our front yard and the 3 yards around it. It drinks from one particular pot of water and lives in my neighbor's overgrown azalea bush.
    Fun story. David/ :-)

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  10. Poke weed is so pretty!!! Looks like a birds sheer heaven for sure!!!

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  11. I need to find some pokeweed for my garden. We get lots of mockingbirds, so they would love it.

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  12. Pokeweed is quite striking with the berries, but it is very hard to get rid - large tuberous type root when the plant is very mature. It's also quite toxic so make sure you follow instructions if using it for human food. I watched two mockingbirds chase each other from tree to tree yesterday, perhaps each was trying to protect the few sources of poke berries in my yard from the other!

    Barbara H.

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  13. I love poke weed. I saw one growing, a volunteer I was told, at BSN one year and fell in love with it then. It needs a better name.

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