Friday, November 16, 2012

WILL I DO IT?

I spend hours outside removing plants and weeds that grow in the pathways. If I only had to do it once a year that would be OK but I seem to do it continuously. We play hopscotch out there, jumping from one stone to another in order to avoid plants.


For some reason the plants seem to prefer the gravel between the pavers: probably because they enjoy a cool root run beneath the stones.



I make resolutions to keep the pathways cleared but somehow I just can't do it. Of course it isn't surprising. Just look at this blanket flower. Now could you pull that out? It has been a staunch bloomer throughout the summer and will likely still be blooming come the spring.


This is the area behind the vegetable beds. It is impossible to walk there without stepping on plants. Gomphrena, marigold mint, salvias and grasses compete with the blanket flowers.


And this is what is to come: California poppies. I have a feeling they are going to get pretty trampled when the tank gets leveled in the spring.


My favorites are the alyssums and narrow leaf zinnias. I never know what color will show up. The dark purple is my favorite.


Mealy blue sage completely covers the pathway in front of the lemon trees.


All these plants seed themselves so I can be sure they will all be there again next year unless I can stick to my resolution.

12 comments:

  1. The way I see it, you have two options:

    1) Do nothing because these plants are AMAZING and I would really miss seeing them (clear pathways are overrated)

    2) Resolve to ONLY let plants grow in the pathways and remove everything else. This will ensure that *nothing* grows in the paths.

    I vote for #1. :-)

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  2. I have the same problem, but what I don't understand is why the very best looking plants are in drives and paths, at least at my place. And I'm no help, because I can't pull them up either. Transplanting is such a chore, so there they are, putting on a show where I don't want one. Maybe Alan is right in his advice choices, but maybe I should just keep the ignored plants in the drive and let the pampered ones in the beds go. Anyway, all of yours are lovely. Looking forward to seeing what you'll do with your tank pond in the spring.

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  3. Don't you dare pull those plants-LOL! It's what I love about your garden-it gives it such a "dreamy" appearance.

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  4. My seedlings do the same and I have the same varieties. this year I added lemon basil and bronze fennel to the mix. The lemon basil was the main winner. My neighbors become so angry with the basil they smashed them along the sidewalk, at least they received the aroma. I should have kept the sidewalks less restrictive and I well next year, it's just so hard to take out plants as you well know.

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  5. I have the same problem...and I'm such a softie, it's hard for me to pull them up. I sort of just let them to their own devices during summer, then whack a patch through in autumn, once the rains flatten things.

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  6. How about taking out the ones that are less attractive, more spindly, or more in the way, but leave the others? And leave your favorite favorites? (I just pulled some feather grass hiding under a sotol that's needed dead leaves cut and removed for 18 months...prickly, but merciless!)

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  7. I vote for leave it. Too pretty!!!

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  8. I take out as many of the volunteers as I can when they're just seedlings ... once they get to bloom stage, I can't stand to yank them!

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  9. Your garden looks beautiful as ever. Walking down paths is over rated. Hopscotch sounds like fun.

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  10. I would have a hard time pulling out those beautiful plants too! (I even have trouble pulling out pretty weeds in my garden!) Well, at least you'll get lots of exercise jumping over all those plants, right? ;)

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  11. I wish I had such a problem. Oh, I just LOVE your path all crowded with such patchwork beauty. I really, really love that look.

    Alan's #2 suggestion up top is hilarious!

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  12. Your garden just wouldn't be your garden without all those self-sowers. It's part of the beauty of your garden, and I'm glad you have the discipline to let them be. Yes, discipline.

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