Sunday, April 28, 2013

A SERIOUSLY GOOD PRUNING

 This week saw the start of the annual seriously good pruning and cutting back days. There will be many more to follow.


This is the walkway down towards the gate at the end of the vegetable garden. Yes, that's mint on the left and the trim back comes at least 3 times a year. For now I was more concerned with getting out the trailing wine cup. It had totally obliterated the path and required a hop, skip and a jump to pass by. It had woven its way up through the seat of the new bench I purchased this year and would soon be in my 'highly successful this year' hayrack planter on the wall. The felt lining did the trick.


This is a hot spot on the wall of the potting shed, facing west and there is no way that even succulents would tolerate such a blast furnace. Soon these plants will have served their time and I will have to think of their replacements. The feather grass, dahlberg daisy and alyssum will stay and likely I will put in some zinnias. For now there are still the stocks to bloom.


This is the pathway alongside the citrus pots. Once the feather grass, mealy blue sage and California poppies were removed I could now reach the far end of the square beds. Three buckets for the compost pile.


This morning I turned my attention to the beds themselves.


Two rows of gone-to-seed arugula. I thought they looked rather pretty with their back drop of blanket flowers until I spotted a harlequin bug on them. Then I pulled them out. I do not want to face an attack of those bugs this year. I also finally removed the gone-to-seed cilantro, carefully removing the remaining lady bugs and relocating them to an aphid colony on the top of the chocolate chip mangave. Apparently they don't like those dizzying heights and have left. Will have to dunk the top in some insecticidal soap.


13 comments:

  1. What kind of wood did you use for your kitchen garden beds and what are the measurements?
    I love your garden style.

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    1. We just used the treated wood and sealed it with stain. I doubt anything would leach into the soil. My neighbor used treated wood and covered the inside with plastic which is also another idea.

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  2. Although I love a path that gets "overrun" with plants, it's so much nicer (and easier!) once you remove the botanical obstructions, isn't it?

    I love that bench! Have you posted a closer look at it yet?

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    1. I think they are OK when small but when they flop over and obstruct they become a nuisance. I need the seeds though. The bench was purchased on line at Walmart and picked up at the local store. I thought it was a good deal at >$100 I needed a backless one.

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  3. Beautiful blooms. It is always good news and bad news when gardens grow well. I spent the weekend trimming tree branches.

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    1. I have so much more to do and trimming the big vines is on the never ending to-do list.

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  4. Your garden is a dream and so are your photos. Vera
    ilghepardowordpress.com

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  5. Magnificent!!! You have such an eye for color and texture!

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  6. So, so, so pretty Jenny. I love that row of terra cotta pots with fruit trees in them.

    I was just lamenting to a neighbor the other day that I wish I could get winecup to grow. One mans trash ... .

    I have what I THINK is mealy blue sage that is taking over part of my back bed. I need to google that. I need to keep better notes too.

    I vote for more pool shots! I love your pool sooo much and it IS that time, you know. hint hint.

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  7. Everything is so lovely, Jenny! My garden is still waking up, so it's a treat to see so many lush blooms. I had no idea argula looked so pretty when it went to seed.

    Thanks for visiting me; I really enjoyed my visit to Texas and hope to see more of the Lonestar State on my next visit.

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  8. I just love your feather grass! It's so nice to have fragrant flowers in your windowbox planter - you can sit on your new bench and enjoy the fragrance right there!

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  9. I was just thinking I would not see any harlequin bugs this year when lo and behold I found some on my giant red mustard. I pulled that mustard out pretty quick. It sure helps to find those problems before they become plagues. Sounds like you feel the same about harlequin bugs as I do.

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  10. Your window box is gorgeous, Jenny. You have such a talent with plant combinations.

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