Wednesday, May 15, 2013

IS IT BLOOM DAY AGAIN? GARDEN BLOGGERS' BLOOM DAY, MAY 2013

I can't believe the middle of the month is here again. I'm joining Carol at Maydreams garden for her special month.


Someone asked me recently what is in bloom in my garden when the early spring blooms leave. Coreopsis tinctoria is one.





A pot of one of my favorite early summer annuals, Brachyscome on the wall between the sunken garden. Is that Verbena bonariensis trying to get into the picture?


The day lilies begin to bloom. I wish I knew their name but the list is long gone. They were all grown and given to me over 10 years ago by a work associate of Ds who bred them.


This one has a little competition from the purple cone flower, Echinacea purpurea, which just started to bloom.


This one is in a more shaded location.


Love-in-a-mist, Nigella makes a big show in the Philippine violet bed, completely hiding it.



The Texas clematis, Clematis pitcheri.


Blackfoot daisies, Melampodium leucanthum, in the gravel English garden.


Creeping germander, Teucrium cossonii. I think I may add more of this plant next year because I have never watered it and it is not under irrigation and yet has survived.


Bee balm, Monarda fistulosa 'Peter's Purple" begins to bloom. Finally a bee balm that flowers in Texas!


The purple skullcap, Scutellaria wrightii.


Heart leaf skullcap, Scutellaria ovata.
What's blooming in your garden this May Bloom Day?

27 comments:

  1. Very pretty!
    Love the Day Lilies and Coneflowers!
    Happy GBBD!
    Lea
    Lea's Menagerie

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  2. That love in a mist is amazing! Do you plant by seed in the fall?

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    1. Amy, they seed themselves after the first year. However I notice a lot of white ones showing up these days. I need to sow some more.

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  3. I love all the little dainty bell-shaped Clems, yours is so pretty. Bloom Day always comes around again so quickly.

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  4. I'm skipping posting on Bloom Day this month, but will enjoy others posts, instead. Yours is lovely! The creeping germander looks like an interesting addition to a dry garden . . .

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  5. Beautiful flowers for bloom day! I recently planted Peter's Purple so good to know it blooms nicely. My germander isn't blooming yet, soon I hope.

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  6. Lots of lovely blooms. I especially like the clematis as well as the way the love in a mist wove its way into the plants.

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  7. That Bee Balm is beautiful. I am going to see if I can find one for my part of Texas.

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  8. That Bee Balm is beautiful. I need to see if I can find one for my part of Texas.

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  9. Lovely, as always. There is a native beebalm, (Monarda citriodora) AKA horsemint, that flowers prolifically and requires almost no care. Deer don't even eat it. Wildflower Center link to it: http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/species.php?id_plant=MOCI

    I'm guessing from your lovely daylily garden that they're growing in a protected space. I have only a few daylillies but had to surround them with rosemary...

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  10. Beautiful blooms! Happy GBBD!!

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  11. So much lovely color cheerfully blooming in the garden. I love the Nigella. Haven't tried it before but really want to now.

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  12. I always enjoy the varieties of coreopsis, and that one in your first photo is a real stunner. All of your blooms are lovely. Happy GBBD!

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  13. Love that little teucrium! Looks like a beautiful May Bloom Day in your garden, Jenny.

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  14. I can't seem to get those sweet dainty bell-shaped clematis to grow in my garden. They do real well a couple of years then then disappear. I wonder if you have the same problem and treat them as annuals?? Your garden is fullll of blooms this time of year. Beautiful. Happy GBBD.

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  15. So many gorgeous blooms. I have day lilies but they always seem to bloom a lot later than the ones I see around town. I had to transplant them a few times after deer nearly killed them and then I chose unwisely and they got too shaded and crowded out by ground covers. I wonder if the deer would eat the creeping germander? It looks like a great choice to get some color into a dry sunny area out front. Thanks for sharing the beauty, Jenny!

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  16. I was wondering when the Love in a Mist was supposed to bloom. I guess that question is answered. Yours look great! Sadly, my plants are only 6-8 inches tall. Seems they are way behind the times. Perhaps the drought and lack of irrigation caused them to get a late start?

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    1. I have lov-in-a-misst at all different stages. SOme is barely a few inches high because it is in poor, dry soil. Bunny Guinness says it makes a great rock garden plant. I think she is right.

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  17. I would live to get hold of some Texas clematis - very nice! And everything else, too!

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  18. I'll look for that creeping germander and the bee balm - I've never come across either here in SoCal but they look promising for our drought-plagued area. Thanks for sharing your current crop of blooms.

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  19. Such a lovely Clematis! And the Nigella is wonderful too. Actually, it all looks great! :)

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  20. Gorgeous, Lancashire Rose! Your garden is always wonderful, and usually a little ahead of mine, so your present realities are my hopes for the future. Just a few daylilies are open here, and both Peter's Purple & Heartleaf Skullcap are in the bud-forming stage. Like Lisa at Greenbow, that lovely Texas clematis has me green with envy.

    Annie at the Transplantable Rose

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  21. Great scenes, all, especially the coneflower and globemallow one. I now must learn how or if your "Creeping Germander" is close to or different than what we call "Greek Germander" / T. aronium!

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  22. Love the 'Peter's Purple' Monarda...I'll be very interested to see how it does for you. I planted 'Purple Rooster' this spring to replace 'Raspberry Wine', which just decided to die out in the center, but I was considering 'Peter's Purple' as an alternate.

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    1. For years I had the Raspberry wine. It always produced leaves but only one year did it flower and then it died. This is more successful. Grows like crazy and easy to divide in the fall. Do give it a try.

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  23. I love your garden and I really like the color selection.

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  24. Your blog is gorgeous! Luchy I am to find it!!!
    Congratulations!

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