Friday, November 15, 2013

GARDEN BLOGGERS' BLOOM DAY, NOVEMBER 2013

Winter arrives in Central Texas. Just when I was enjoying the response of the garden to our recent rainfall, following a droughty summer, old Jack Frost points his icy finger at my garden and zaps my most vulnerable plants. Last night the temperature dropped to 27°


Just two days ago I was planning to show you how the Philadelphus virginalis 'Natchez', was back in flower again.


and how pretty the Gomphrena globosa 'little grapes' looked against the sweet potato vine. Now all these vulnerable plants have wilted and burnt. Only the hardiest are still in flower and those that are in warmer places in the garden.
It is a great time to discover microclimates in the garden. We all have them. I have one big microclimate in my garden. Most of the garden will be colder than the surrounding area as a result of our being low down on a hill. But within the garden I have one or two pockets which are more forgiving. So this morning the plumbago was still blooming.


And the Philippine violet, Barleria cristata, which seeded at the edge of the pathway, close by, was unscathed. Unlike its parent around the corner.


The Copper Canyon daisy, Tagetes lemonnii, is always the last of the natives to flower in my garden. Brush past the foliage and you can smell why the deer avoid this plant.


Mexican mint marigold, Tagetes lucida, Survived the cold night.


And of course alyssum. Present throughout every season.


Surprisingly Gaura sp. also continues to bloom.


And it a few places the gomphrena 'fireworks' he narrow foliage seems to make this more hardy than the other gomphrenas.


Texas enjoys wild swings in temperature. This weekend we will have a high of 85° Now I need to protect the plants int he greenhouse, not from frost, but from sunscald!
I hope you will join Carol of Maydreams gardens, this November Bloom Day, to share your bloom day photographs. I shall be checking them out. Thanks Carol.

18 comments:

  1. Wow-that is some extremes in temps!
    We're see sawing all over the place, but not to such an extent.
    We had 4" of snow a few days ago, and am expecting 60 degrees this weekend.
    Your blooms are still lovely (the tough ones, at least)
    Have a wonderful weekend.

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  2. I'm in Alabama & got zapped too....to add insult to injury...it will be in the 70s tomorrow....but what you have is still truly beautiful. Happy gbbd!

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  3. Seriously? From a 27 degree low you reverse and have an 85 degree high? That's just crazy.

    I love the photo of Gomphrena globosa 'little grapes' with the sweet potato vine, perfect!

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  4. Very pretty!
    How bright and cheerful the yellows are!
    Happy GBBD!
    Lea

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  5. Beautiful are the photos!
    Greetings from Holland, RW & SK

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  6. We've had some temperature swings too, although our lows don't go down that far. The Gomphrena 'Little Grapes" (called 'Itsy Bitsy' here) looks great photographed against the sweet potato vine - I can never get a good shot of mine. Happy GBBD!

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    1. I agree Kris this gomphrena is impossible to photo until it found itself in among the sweet potato vine.

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  7. I lived in Texas (Wichita Falls) many years ago. I remember some of those extremes. I loved each and every one of your photos.What a beautiful garden.

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    1. It is something we have to live with here. At least it gives the garden a break to have a freeze and the gardener too!

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  8. These early wild swings from frost to heat are my excuse for my reluctance to haul large plants into the garage or greenhouse on the front end of what passes for winter here in Central Texas. I keep thinking - maybe it won't get THAT cold and/or I KNOW it will warm back up. I ask myself - do I want to move that heavy planter one time for the season or keep moving it back and forth...? Like that.

    Which explains why I lose a plant (or three) every season when I guess wrong. Our lows here west of town didn't drop to below freezing but I am higher up on a little ridge. And it took me forever to realize but you are absolutely right- after a significant frost is the perfect time to suss out your microclimates. I'm finally gardening smart enough to take advantage of that and thanks for the reminder!

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    1. We pulled all ours in and now they are out again. Mainly because we have children here this weekend and I have so many spiny ones. Fortunately there are no complains from the lifter! We chose to build down below on the lot instead of on the top so that we could walk out of the house into the garden. I don't suppose that I would have changed my mind even f I had thought about the frost problem. Just another challenge.

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  9. I enjoy viewing your gardens very much. I love the Gomphrena 'little grapes'. Would you know where I could get seed?
    Thanks,
    Melanie from Ohio

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    1. Sorry to be s late in replying. My seeds came from a friends garden. I would have loved to have sent you some but my plant blooms very late int he season and the frost got to the plant before the seeds were ripe.You might try the seed catalogues or just put the name in on google. Someone must have the seeds because I see them selling the plants at the nursery.

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  10. Very nice photos. We've had temp swings here as well, but nothing like your range. The Tagetes lemonii scent is an acquired taste, for sure, but I've grown to enjoy it. It's also blooming here. Happy GBBD!

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    1. I imagine you are right about that. I actually like it and vitex too.

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  11. So sorry you got an early freeze...I just barely missed one here in Houston. I love that little gomphrena against the sweet potato vine. I must try and find one next Spring. The gomphrenas were something my grandmother used to grow long ago. I'm glad to have them in my garden. So cute!
    Happy GBBD! David/:0)

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  12. Isn't it crazy? Cover peppers one night, remove cover since it's hot.

    As I finished your edit for Jan. 4, and your comment about English vs. Texas weather, at least in England, it's not 30 degree differential in a few days. But here, in your garden, how delightful to see what's still going after frost.

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  13. Love those Gomphrena globosa 'little grapes' - So cute! Your alyssum looks beautiful. Do you grow it from seed or transplants?

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