Thursday, April 24, 2014

GOOD MORNING SUNSHINE

Sometimes we linger too long drinking our early morning tea and watching the news. The sun is already making its appearance over the tree tops.


It will make photography difficult.

But there is still time to capture flowers in the lower part of the sunken garden which is still in the shadows.


I knew it was going to be a good year for the blue-eyed grass, Sisyrichium angustifolium.  Its grassy leaves line every space between the flagstones. Such a pretty little flower.


Wine cups, Callirhoe involucrata, will soon be open. and they will soon take over the garden if I don't cut them back frequently.

The sun is already bathing the vegetable garden and will soon be in the herb garden. It is catching the seed heads on the Mexican feather grass. Time to put the camera away.

32 comments:

  1. That opening shot is breathtaking - it belongs on the cover of a garden book!

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    1. Thanks Kris. The sun on the lens made for a perfect photo.

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  2. Beautiful! Your garden is amazing in every kind of light. It does get tough to capture a garden in full Texas sun though.

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    1. Mornings and evenings. That's my motto.

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  3. I concur--that top shot is incredible....... Sort of a prelude to the glory beyond the door. Your garden never ceases to amaze.

    I have a question--I have been trying for YEARS to get callirhoe to grow. I have tried starting it in flats, starting it in situ. Any thoughts on
    what I can try? It looks like it would "spread" easily. I just can't get it started!

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    1. It is a weed in my garden seeding itself everywhere. I wonder if maybe you have a king that is not producing viable seed. The plant eventually makes a turnip-like tuber which is impossible to remove from under the paving. Maybe you could try seeding it in gravel or I could send you some of mine.

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    2. Mine also reseeds in normal clay soil. Note that deer and rabbits both like this, so maybe they're cleaning out the tender plants before you see them?

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    3. Yes. I have a few planted outside and the deer do come by on occasion and nibble them. They are in rather poor conditions so never get very big. I noticed one or two with flowers on this morning. There is rosemary near by and maybe that puts them off.

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  4. I think I might welcome the sun if I it was illuminating a view like yours. Really breathtaking shot! I am so smitten with winecup - mine has to fight for a toehold against earlier emerging primrose and long established daisy rosettes. It is slowly but sure establishing itself and seeing yours gives me hope it will prevail eventually.

    Is that a blue skullcap planted around the winecup (perhaps it is purple?) - haven't seen that color and it is wonderful!

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    1. It is strange how different plants behave in different gardens. My trailing wine cup would swallow the whole garden. There is another wine cup that is more delicate-standing wine cup. You are correct on the skullcap, Scutellaria wrightii, another self seeder when the snails don't get tot he seedlings first.

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    2. Just stumbled on to your blog this morning! You garden is lovely! It may seem odd but I miss gardening in a drier climate. Thank you for making me smile : )

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    3. Glad you dropped by Laurin. Every climate has its advantages and challenges.

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  5. Beautiful photographs
    The hare statute is perfect where it is.

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    1. He was a lovely gift from a friend when we moved into the house. He loves being among the flowers.

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  6. Beautiful! Sometimes it's fun to see a different sun-drenched perspective. :-)

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  7. Agree on the first photo, beautiful shot! It's been a great year for blue eyed grass in my garden as well. I didn't even know I had any until this year, and now they are everywhere.

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    1. I remember a similar thing a few years ago. I guess they just liked the conditions. I always have them although not quite so many.

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  8. What an incredible morning! You captured it perfectly. I wish we could pocket a couple of these to have in the middle of August.

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    1. Sometimes the sun on the lens captures a perfect moment. Let's not think about August yet. They are saying 90° today.

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  9. Beautiful. You always have so much going on in your garden.

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    1. Thanks Linda. I could say it is almost too busy.

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  10. Is there any secret to getting feather grass to stay upright like that? Mine have always flopped. Is it all about growing them in gravel? Are they weak in heavy soils? This grass is not attractive when flopped over. :(

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    1. I don't usually keep feather grass from year to year. It reseeds and if I see a good one I pull out last years in the late winter. They are growing in sand under the pavers so maybe that is the answer although they are growing in gravel outside and look just the same.

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  11. I'll be unoriginal and mention that the first photo is a stunner--wow! I also like 'bunny with winecup'--charming.

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  12. Isn't bunny lovely. He was a housewarming gift from a friend.

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  13. Question. Do you trim the pavers around the Mexican feather grass to give them more space? Or are they truly in a 2 to 3 inch space?

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    1. No Maria, the pavers are set in sand with 2" gaps. The plants have no problems with the space.

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  14. What a magical place to have breakfast and watch the sun come up! This reminds me of a southwestern version of those fairy tale gardens where you half expect a unicorn to walk through...

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  15. Thank you for sharing your beautiful garden with us! The pictures are breathtaking! My blue eyed grass was prolific this year as well.

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