Sunday, October 30, 2011

A VARIED DIET

I caught the mocking bird flying out of the pyracantha today. He likes a varied diet.


Having eaten all the American Beautyberry berries he now has lantana as an appetizer, pokeweed as a main course with a side of chile pequin and pyracantha for dessert.


I'm certainly glad he hasn't stumbled on the pomegranates. They have all taken on this ruby red appearance, standing out like beacons. The strange thing is that you never know what they will look like inside until you cut into them. This one had rather pale seeds. They taste just as good as the ones with really luscious red seeds.


But I like it much better when I cut into one and see this.


For years we struggled with a way to get those seeds out. It was always a supremely messy job and we always had red fingers and seeds all over the place. The last year a friend bought me this simple device. It really work well. Halve the fruit and put it over the grid. Tap the back of the pomegranate with a spoon and all the seeds drop into the container.


We have them on our breakfast cereal/oatmeal every morning. They add a tangy crunch and I know they must be good for us.

9 comments:

  1. You've got the Pyracantha trained up a trellis or something? Looks great, and I'd love to hear more about its growing conditions and maintenance. I'm looking for something tough that can take a lot of sun and heat, little fertilizer, and can be trained up a trellis.

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  2. Your poms are beautiful. Guess I'd better harvest mine. Isn't it fun to watch the birds eating all the different seeds? I love your pyracantha - it's stunning.

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  3. Digging the seeds out of the Pomegranates was the best part when I was a kid, now the worst. What a handy device!

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  4. Alan- The p is espaliered on the wall. No trellis. When it was young I trained it by cutting off any shoots that were growing to the back and front. When it became large enough we fastened it tot he wall with anchors. It now covers the whole wall. I never fertilize it. It is on an east facing wall so does not get the full brunt of the Texas sun, but I also have one on west facing wall that gets no water, fertilizer. It is rubbish. Small but attractive.
    Diana- Hope they a ruby red inside. They look so pretty in a salad.
    Danger garden- I remember that too. It was a serious treat-like a coconut.

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  5. You have your own Pomegranates? I am jealous! I used to buy them, but now they make all these concentrated 100% juices, and I chose an easy way. Although, nothing can beat fresh fruit!

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  6. I need one of those kitchen gadgets! That pyracantha is quite eye-catching.

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  7. Tatyana-We love our pomegranates. I think it has some amazing health properties. I have never bought the POM. Will have to try it some day.
    Caroline-It really is a time saver.

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  8. Nice food selection - aren't we all glad the pomegranates are too large for birds?!?

    And that pomegranate gadget...have to get one. Our local plants should be bearing again in 1-2 years, once they recover...

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  9. They accept all taken on this bittersweet red appearance, continuing out like beacons. The aberrant affair is that you never apperceive what they will attending like central until you cut into them.

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