Wednesday, August 8, 2012

FELBRIGG WALLED GARDEN,


FELBRIGG WALLED GARDEN

Wednesday June 27th 2012

We knew that Felbrigg closed at 5pm and we were hoping that the gate to the garden would still be open. We parked the car and walked towards the house. By a stroke of good fortune I happened to be talking about the walled garden as we passed someone who was leaving. They told us the walled garden was back near the car park. At this point we started to run to be met with disappointment at the gate which was closed and said 'closed'! Not quite 5pm we begged the lady who was in attendance to let us have a few minutes in the garden. She kindly opened the gate. And so I rushed around like a crazy person taking photos of the best walled garden I have ever visited.

Of course the walled garden was far away from the house. We had already learnt that during the landskip movement nothing must impede the natural look of the countryside when viewed from the house. So the walled gardens, which had previously been much closer to the house for practical purposes, were moved well out of sight. The center piece of this walled garden is the working dovecote seen here. I believe it is the only one in Britain.


These gardens still produce all the fruit and vegetables for the restaurant at the house but they also have stunning ornamental plantings.



As we walked down the lavender lined pathway we disturbed the doves who were pecking away among the stones.


Fruit trees are espaliered along all the walls for additional warmth.



Although I like neat pathways there is nothing prettier in my eyes than plants spilling over and softening the paths. It seems every plant under the sun will grow in England the climate is so hospitable, even in their drought and poor summer.



Billowing Crambe cordifolia, so airy and light. We saw this last year in Seattle but never in Austin!





Yes, we can grow this in Austin but then they can grow it here too!!


Always the walls and archways adorned with flowering vines. A perfect combination.



I know that the owners of East Ruston talked about their sandy neutral pH soil and we had the same where I grew up. We also had these mesembryanthemums in our garden too. Incredible Thai silk, jewel-box colors. Native to South Africa they like Norfolk too.


Surely they would like to grow in Austin.



Greenhouses, once again built against the wall but this time the wall extended t give extra height.





I just don't want to leave this gorgeous place. I am giddy with all the breathtaking color, the warm stillness of the late afternoon and bees buzzing among the flowers.
But we must be on our way, find a pub for dinner and then find our B&B.

First things first. Dinner at the Crown Inn, East Rudham. Fully booked later, but this early they could fit us in at exactly the table we would have chosen to sit at.


Then on to Kenilworth Small Holding. Our accommodation was a purpose built extension to the house with its own little patio and looking out over their gardens.


We immediately went outside to explore.


A grotto in the greenhouse.


A green man on the wall.


And an Oriental inspired garden. Our hostess, who happened to have grown up in our home town, teaches Tai Chi.




Every little nook and cranny filled with plants.


In the vegetable garden the inevitable broad bean plants with their striking flowers.


A home for bees and butterflies.


Thursday June 28th 2012,

 In the morning we enjoy a Continental breakfast on the patio.


With this view.


A new day has arrived and I have quite a lot on the schedule before we end up at my cousin's house near Nottingham.


17 comments:

  1. Thank you for the wonderful post and photos
    And a thank you to the lady who let you in the garden. Those pink daisies flowers are stunning!

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    1. Yes indeed. I wouldn't have missed this for anything. Glad you dropped by to see it too.

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  2. I'm glad the lady let you in too. What a delightful garden -- there's really nothing to beat English gardens is there? I love those mesembryanthemums - they were always my favorites as a child. Mum had them growing in her rock garden and I loved the colors and the sparkly frosting they had to them.

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    1. Yes, I remember their foliage too. It all looked so exotic growing in an English coastal garden. I can remember going out with a milk bottle of water to water them.

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  3. I absolutely must take a vacation to England and visit Felbrigg. I loved all the pictures but my favorite is the plate of food at the Crown Inn - that looks scrumptious.

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    1. And it was. British food has come a long way.

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  4. Gorgeous...just gorgeous.
    And, I agree...a thank you to the lady that let you in the walled garden.

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  5. Looking at those gardens is so inspiring! Y'all must have been in heaven. How lovely your trip must have been. WHAT IN THE WORLD are those flowers in the first picture that look like candy corn on sticks?????

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    1. I certainly was in heaven. I think the flowers of which you speak are true geraniums. Not pelargoniums.

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  6. That third photo of David walking down the garden path convinces me too that this must be one of the finest walled gardens in England! I covet that honey-colored gravel, one of the things we argue about at home -- Marty loathes gravel and I disagree vehemently. And what amazing slanted greenhouses. Thank god the lady in attendance was the flexible sort to let you in after hours.

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    1. I agree with you about the gravel. I am always looking for the honey colored one rather than the grey. Sorry Marty doesn't like the gravel. Surely some photos like this would convince him otherwise.

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  7. Impressive tour, as those from Galloping Gardener...Until then...


    Here a small garden with signature...always a work in progress in the Caribbean.http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7741396/5_gardening_blogs_you_should_read.html?cat=32


    http://www.guiaverde.com/blog/destacadas/jardin-tropical-en-puerto-rico

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    1. Thanks for dropping by to view my garden travels. I'll be sure to check out your garden progress.

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  8. I've just caught up with all of your garden touring. my head is whirling with colors, plants, ideas. It looks like you had a wonderful time (except for the car break-in). I am in awe of those home gardens you saw. So many US gardeners seem afraid to go all the way and really do what they want and not worry about the neighbors etc. Such style and personality.

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  9. Yes, it had me a little dizzy too, especially Felbrigg Hall. We can but dream!

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  10. "It seems every plant under the sun will grow in England the climate is so hospitable, even in their drought and poor summer." That is so not fair - it reminds me of the Pacific Northwest. :-) Beautiful images of the walled garden. Thanks for sharing!

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  11. I love when you travel because I feel like I get to tag along

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