Sunday, September 15, 2013

GARDEN BLOGGERS' BLOOM DAY, SEPTEMBER 2013

My flowers are happy to be featured once more on Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day, after a summer hiatus. Thanks to Carol, at Maydreams Gardens for hosting.
There are some plants which are late to appear in my garden. Plumbago, seen below is one. It disappears over the winter only to begin growing when summer days are at their most fierce. The little bee returned with me from our travels.


Blazing star, Liatris spicata, is also a late bloomer and is perfectly suited to the company of cactus and agaves in the dry limestone gravel.


This week the first of the oxblood lilies, Rhodophiala bifida, made their appearance. I almost missed them, situated as they are at the back of the rock garden. Maybe they deserve a place in the spotlight as they bloom for such a short period if time. More are to follow judging by the buds just showing.


In the stock tank water garden the first bloom on the crinum, a passalong from Pam Penick at Digging.


Fall obedient plant, Physostegia virginiana.


Gregs blue mistflower, Conoclinium greggii..


Sparks flying from Gomphrena 'fireworks' This is a plant that leaves an aroma of curry on the air when you brush up against it. Good thing it is in the potager.


In the same garden narrow leaf zinnia, Zinnia linearis, adds a punch of color.


Rudbeckia grows between the pads of the spineless prickly pear which render support.


Watering with a hose, on my return, revived many plants including this blackfoot daisy, Melampodium leucanthum, growing among the pink crystal grasses.


Rose 'Felcia' is blooming for the third time this year. You can't walk by this rose without stooping to smell her wonderful fragrance..


The purple skullcap, Scutellaria wrightii along with an annual seedling salvia.


From time to time the cross vine, Bignonia capreolata, sends out a spray of flowers.


A surprise blooming of the Texas clematis. I have always been disappointed in the color of this one which looks wishy-washy against the garden wall.


Migrating hummingbirds are having a field day with the flame acanthus, Anisacanthus quadrifidus.


The garden may be looking a little tired because of the heat and lack of rain but there are still plenty of blooms to enjoy.
Hope you are enjoying the blooms in your garden this September bloom day.

28 comments:

  1. Very beautiful!
    I've never heard of a spineless prickly pear cactus. Where did you find it?
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea
    Lea's Menagerie

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    1. A friend gave me a few pads. They do have glochids which are tiny hairs that will stick in your skin if you are careless. They grow so quickly that i am always wondering what to do with them. If you are down in Austin let me know. I am sure i could give you some.

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  2. That rose is stunning — and on its third bloom? Yikes, that is a real garden winner. I have been seeing that gomphrena in containers this summer and wondering what it was, so thanks for the i.d. Your garden is looking fabulous as always. Enjoyed reading about your travels and your shopping along the way!

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    1. That gomphrena fireworks is quite show stopper. It lasts well into the fall and I saved the seeds from last year. Not quite as prolific in its seedling but I managed enough to satisfy my needs.

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  3. If my hedgerow walk made you homesick, Jenny, let me tell you that your flowers are making me green with envy. It still looks like summer where you are! Here, autumn has definitely arrived.

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    1. Summer you say. It is still in the 902. We are all fed up with summer. What we want is rain followed by clear skies. Maybe too much to ask.

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  4. And you just recently said no sign of a bloom on your pond crinum -- they come on fast, don't they? So glad it's giving you a flower in time for Bloom Day.

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    1. I was amazed to find the plant with two blooms. The first one was a dud but the second one was a delight. Thanks so much for planting my tank for me!

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  5. You have posted some great photos today. I can almost feel the arid atmosphere projected in the photos - love that. Sure enjoyed my visit. it is so different here on the shores of Lake Michigan - lots of water! See you soon. Jack

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    1. It must be lovely to be on the water-so cooling. We used to live on the St Lawrence. Loved it there. Incredible fall color and seasons!

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  6. Love seeing the blazing star in your garden! And beautiful color on the crinum foliage and and Felicia rose. I haven't noticed the curry scent of the fireworks gomphrena but now I'm going out to check (guess I lucked out putting it next to lemongrass).

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    1. Tell me if your lemon grass is a monster? Mine certainly is. I do love it though because it is on the corner of the potting shed and softens the building.

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    2. My lemongrass IS a bit of a monster! I would have set it somewhere else if I had known, but maybe I'll make a dent in it with some Thai soups when it cools off.

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  7. Your garden looks splendid for a place where the gardener was absent for a long time. Glad you got home in time to see the Rhodofiala.

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    1. If only you knew how many buckets of stuff I have cut back and thrown away this past week! It was a jungle.

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  8. Your garden is looking as fresh as spring! And I swear you and Pam are converting me about the crinum flowers. I didn't care for them to begin with but now I'm kind of hoping To see mine bloom.

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    1. I like the foliage too which is a good thing because the flower only lasts for a day. Hope yours flowers soon.

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  9. Love the new addition to your garden. It is Bee-tiful:) Your Liatris is so pretty and looks right at home in its flowerbed. Those oxblood lilies are so cute!

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    1. It is so nice of nature to save some bloomers for the fall a we have no leaf changes.

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  10. I'm very interested in the crinum. Nice.

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  11. I'm so excited to see your pond crinum blooming! I better go check mine; I don't want to miss it. Considering the drought and your long vacation, your garden looks great! I'd love to know your secret!

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  12. I have yet to see any action on my oxblood lilies this year. I'm wondering if mine are using a different calendar! Your blooms are lovely and I'm especially envious of your roses - my favorite seems to have suffered heat damage this year. Fingers crossed our cooler temps at night will coax it back.

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    1. Only this one clump is flowering. The others are only just peeping through the soil

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  13. You have a wonderful collection of blooms in your late summer garden. I like the addition of the bee too!

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  14. You are a hero of mine! Been meaning to comment for a while, I love your garden and your blog. Please take good care of yourself - you are educating beginner gardeners like me. I want to be like you someday!! Exercise equipment and all. :)

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