Wednesday, October 21, 2015

WE'LL GROW WHERE WE WANT TO GROW

It would appear that most of the time I don't have much say in where plants are going to grow. I would like them in the beds. They would like to grow in the pathways.


This is the scene between two of the beds in the vegetable garden and is played out in may places in the garden. Here's another grouping slap bang in the middle of the two beds. They all want to be in the same place. Mexican feather grass, alyssum, narrow-leaf zinnia, Zinnia linearis, and a gaillardia, Gaillardia pulchella.


My job is to do some weeding out so that we can actually walk through the area. As usual the ruby crystal grass seedlings have been abundant. I must have pulled out over 50.


It is hard to believe that 4 weeks ago there was nothing growing here except the mealy blue sage, Salvia farinacea.  More narrow-leaf zinnia, Zinnia linearis, dahlberg daisy, Dyssodia tenuifolia and gomphrena, Gomphrena globosa.


The one disappointment this year has been the seedling chocolate daisy, which seems determined to co-habit with another seedling gopher plant. You can see the pair here in the lower center of the photo. I am wondering how this is going to play out. Should I make the choice for them?
This is the sunken garden where I rely on plants to self-seed.


Another plant that is in abundance this year is the native frost weed, Verbesina virginica. I saw this being sold as a shade plant at a recent Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower center sale. In my garden it has seeded with abundance this year in full sun. Not only does it put on this floral show in the fall, but when we have a frost it will exude water from the stem which will create  incredible crystal like structures. For now it is a favorite of the bees.



It is always a thrill for me to find a special plant has reseeded. Such is the case with this Philippine violet. It found a spot right along the edge of the path. I hope I can get it out without damage when it loses its leaves.


A similar seedling along the edge of the walkway to the patio was never removed. It is a good job that it dies back every winter because it is now too late to move it. Why do they always choose the edges?


This garden just wouldn't be the same without all the help I get from mother nature.

7 comments:

  1. I'm glad I'm not the only one with "prime" seedlings growing in bad places! I also don't know what I'd do without reseeders -- the garden would be boring without them!

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  2. The ones popping up in the weirdest or least convenient places are always the nicest specimens, are they not? Your flowery paths look just picture-perfect!

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  3. It is a pretty nice problem to have, at least going by your photos. Such gorgeous flowers all volunteering their participation, albeit in some spot they've washed or blown to. I try to blame the weather, the seeds just do what they are supposed to do once they land in tolerable growing conditions.

    Because I'm such a lazy weeder, there is quite a seed bank developing in our the gravel of our paths. I'm trying to be more diligent, and I'm always relieved when something growing in the path is a plant I want as opposed to all the other stuff. As a matter of fact, I'm taking this post as a reminder to get out and finish up weeding the path. Trowels crossed we get some good thorough gently soaking rains in the next few days!

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  4. Although I appreciate the work it takes to ensure a degree of order, your garden is always so pretty with its collections of self-seeded flowers. I'm finally getting more self-seeders myself but nothing like yours. I may be a little too quick to cut things back and pull up unidentified newcomers.

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  5. You do have the best garden for volunteers, from wildflowers to trees.

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  6. It looks beautiful! I know it is hard to weed sometimes, though, when they all grow all together like that. I kind of like that daisy with the gopher plant, though. From the picture, it looks like the gopher plant has yellow flowers in the middle!

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  7. It is amazing, how many volunteers you have. Just doesn't work the same here.
    The only things that reseed here are things I don't want.
    Love the Philippine violet.....

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