Thursday, March 23, 2017

BLUEBONNET BONANZA

Once again the area in front of our house is awash with our state flower, the Texas bluebonnet, Lupinus texensis.


This year, with a little of  my help, they are even spreading down the road and onto the empty lot next door to us.


Native plants love a lean soil and they do not do well in competition with grasses. I see a patch of annual rye grass out front that needs dealing with before it sets seed, so that bluebonnets can grow there next year.


Bluebonnets love to grow in decomposed granite so down the side wall that surrounds our front. It's not easy to pick your way round to the side gate. They have even covered the rocks on the left side.




Behind that wall it suits me just to have one two blooming among the other native spring wildflowers.


I am a little more forgiving in the English garden where large expanses of gravel quickly fill with bluebonnets.




And there is always room for just one in the sunken garden. One plant can easily cover 3'


And I don't mind doing the odd high jump to get to the vegetable beds.


But soon the time will come when the bluebonnets go to seed and we must wait for the seeds ripen before they are removed.

I don't need to go traveling to enjoy this bonanza of bluebonnets.....but I probably will. Next week will be the perfect time to take a little road trip to see roadsides of our other spring native flowers.

21 comments:

  1. Your bluebonnets are a delight to see every year. Thanks, for sharing them with those of us unable to grow these beauties.

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    1. Bluebonnets seem to be our easiest plant to grow. Having said that spider mites have been a problem this yer and I fear we will not be getting quite so much seed. I'll blame it on the uncharacteristic weather we have been having.

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  2. How beautiful! I would love to see your garden on a home tour. It just looks spectacular.
    Malcolm W.
    Abilene, TX

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    1. Thanks Malcolm. We have been on several garden tours in the past. It's very rewarding but at the same time a pretty stressful time. We were also featured in Southern Living magazine. From now on it is only private gardens tours.

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    2. What month is your garden featured? I would like to see it if possible.

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    3. It was April 2012, so long gone. But you can see the content of the magazine on Pam Penick's blog article.
      http://www.penick.net/digging/?p=15438

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  3. Thank you for sharing your beautiful bluebonnets, Jenny. :) I hope to hear where your wildflower travels take you and what you find.

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    1. We will no doubt follow the Willow Loop once more. Hopefully next week.

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  4. Beautiful.
    I may try planting some here again. Maybe the deer will leave them alone, this time.
    It's worth a try.

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    1. I think the secret is to throw out a lot of seed. Deer may nibble at one or two but there is safety in numbers. I'll try and save some for you.

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  5. Absolutely stunning! I love that you've been spreading them along the road and into the empty lot next door. Lupines and other wild flowers are just starting to emerge here. Everything is so late, but it is starting to feel more like spring.

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  6. LOVELY! It's a rare time these days I get bluebonnets but I don't have that lean soil at all. So, I'll just love yours.

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  7. There's not much I can think of that's prettier than Texas bluebonnets and your display is always stunning. I've tried and failed to establish them in my own garden but lupines do grow along the main road leading from our peninsula into the nearby beach cities.

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  8. Beautiful! And I like how there are so many... It's like you have a Bluebonnet preserve.

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  9. Those are just gorgeous! I am a lover of lupine foliage, does that stick around? Or fade in your summer heat?

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    1. They are annuals. Waiting for them o set seed is the tough part. Then all the dead foliage has to be cleared away.

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  10. Lovely masses of bluebonnets, like a tide washing over the rocks. Thanks for sharing!

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  11. Such lovely pictures- I always enjoy reading your posts!

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    1. Thanks Lauren. That is so nice to hear.

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