Friday, September 1, 2017

AFTER THE RAIN

It has taken me a few days to even think about mentioning the damage my garden sustained. It's all minor compared with what Houstonians and those along the coast are facing and will face for years to come. With Austin 200 miles away from the coast our rainfall didn't come anywhere close to that at the coast and while the winds did some damage none of it was catastrophic. We didn't lose any big trees and are forever grateful that we don't have trees overhanging the house, having lost those 5 large oaks several years ago. I'm glad we got those down immediately. We had lots of twigs and leaves scattered all over the place and in the plants. My poor oaks are not in very good shape and now they lost more leaves.
But the rain has gone and the sun shines again and the garden couldn't be happier. In less than a week the oxblood lilies, Rhodofiala bifida. began to bloom. Sometimes known by the name naked ladies because the flowers come before the foliage, they appear overnight, a signal that cooler weather is on the way.


A new crop of the pink rain lilies.


Everything in the garden is refreshed. Wafts of almond fragrance from the blackfoot daisies, Melampodium leucanthum. I wish they were a little more generous in spreading their seed. But this one found a perfect home in the English garden among the stone steps.


More seeded among the grasses in the front courtyard garden.


There's nothing a seed likes better than to find itself in a gravel bed. No fertilizing or watering needed here.


Across the garden the flowers on Rosa Felicia are beginning to show a deeper pink color. Sometimes, even on the hottest day her fragrance wafts through the arch.


The first blooms of liatris hang over the low dry stone wall in the English garden.


I can almost hear the plants saying, 'We made it through the summer and now we have fall to look forward to.' I hope this is the case. Those cooler mornings do make all the difference.

7 comments:

  1. Glad you are all OK. I think it will take a while to see but I am assuming we will all be affected by this storm in some way.

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  2. Thanks for this report. I was wondering how you Austinites fared.

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  3. I'm glad things are looking good in your garden.

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  4. It looks gorgeous!

    Three downed trees here in SW Montgomery county plus some flood damage in the edible garden but thankfully no water or damage to the house. I haven't ventured much beyond my immediate area, mostly because some areas are still closed, but I imagine it will be pretty rough for the majority of Houston for the rest of the year.

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  5. I'm glad you avoided the worst of Hurricane Harvey. I really need to try Melampodium in my garden - you never see the plants for sale here but perhaps I'll try seed. A chance of rain has suddenly appeared in our own forecast for tomorrow. If it materializes, it won't be much but welcome nonetheless after our extended heatwave.

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  6. I'm enjoying the refreshing change in our plants / weather way out here, though it dried out fast. Your plants definitely have a completely revived appearance.

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  7. Your garden is stunning. A rain is like having a rebirth there, isn't it?! Spring, all over again. Lovely!

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