Wednesday, April 10, 2013

OH! THOSE PINKS

Today it is raining and the temperature has dropped 40° overnight. I just cancelled a garden group who were to visit today. I have time on my hands.
Monday was the last day for the blooming of the one flower on my ladyfinger cactus, Echinocereus pentapophus. She has bloomed not stop for 6 days. I shall really miss her.


But taking over is rosa 'Felicia' (1928) Felicia is a repeat flowering Hybrid Musk rose. She is the sweetest rose with clusters of pink flowers which perfume the garden with a baby powder fragrance. I cut this rose right down in February but next year I think I will try to have her grow on some kind of support. Her thin branches have difficulty in holding up the weight of her blooms and I think she would look better as a pillar rose. Because of her modest size she is also well suited to growing in a container.


The other sweet smelling rose, but growing in a different garden, is Zepherine Drouhin (1868). Although described as a repeat bloomer her main bloom time is in the spring when her clusters of cerise flowers perfume the air.


I have three of these roses. The original, in the front garden, never performs as well as this one at the back of the pool garden. As I have mentioned before, this rose appeared after I removed a potted cutting standing in this particular spot. It is in full sun and the branches are allowed to arch and grow in a spontaneous manner. Tension on the branches results in the best blooming with branches studded with blooms along their length. I have another potted rose in the herb garden. She has no flowers this year. All were cuttings from the original rose in the front garden.


They can keep an eye on each other through the archway.

5 comments:

  1. How sweet the roses can get a peek at each other through the arch.

    Plenty of time on our hands today is about right. They must have been disappointed to miss touring your beautiful garden today. I had plans for my garden today, but it's also very windy so the combination makes for an uncomfortable day in the garden.


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  2. Roses are so sweet ...
    Felicia rose is lovely, and Zepherine is spectacular! seem to feels good with arching branches.
    Happy gardening!

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  3. I grow the Felicia rose too. She has my name! I have a similar problem here in Georgia with her growing long, thin canes that can hardly support her blooms. But she is lovely!

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  4. Isn't this weather completely insane? Sorry you had to cancel your garden group. My Felicia rose and all my veggies are shivering out in the cold. Luckily, I'm warm inside enjoying the rain. I hope you are too.

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  5. Lovely, all! I bought 'Felicia' last fall because of your recommendation. She is coming out beautifully now w/buds but only one bloom has opened here; I'm behind you usually by about a week or two. 'Felicia' is growing on a low section of wire fence, which sounds right per your weak stem info here. I always learn something valuable from your blog. Thanks.

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