Tuesday, August 15, 2017

GARDEN BLOGGERS' BLOOM DAY AUSGUST 2017

I am joining Carol at May Dreams Gardens to celebrate August Bloom Day. Won't you visit her garden and see who is joining her from around the world to celebrate Bloom Day.

The rain has brought new life to my parched garden. Leucophyllum frutescens, commonly called Texas sage, but more aptly the barometer bush, responded after about 10 days with a flush of flowers.


Roadside are blooming with the more commonly seen purple sage. In our neighborhood irrigation never results in a bloom so I feel sure that a change in pressure and a cold front with rain is the trigger.


This little native shrugs off the 100º days.


As does the chocolate daisy, Berlandiera lyrata, although the early morning blooms will be closed by noon.


The Japanese lantern flower, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis var. schizopetalus.



My clematis just don't like Texas summers but has struggled to produce two blooms for bloom day.


It's been a week for blooms on the Echinopis. First a white and then a pink one.



It is always the same little bees who come to visit these flowers but never any seeds.


I hope everyone is enjoying their garden on this August bloom day. It's 100º here in Austin. That's number 35 for the year!

15 comments:

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    1. Thanks Lauren. We are hanging in there.

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  2. Your climate is so unlike mine, in upstate New York. It's amazing how nature can adapt and create beauty in all conditions. I loved each of your photos. Happy GBBD!

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    1. I gardeners for 12 years along the lake in Ontario so not far from you. How we looked forward to those summers and how well everything grew. No bugs or problems. The best vegetables I ever grew. I don't envy your winters as I remember them only too well but it would be nice to have a break.

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  3. 100F, yikes! Your garden is full of joy despite the heat. That hibiscus never ceases to amaze me with its perfection and I'd say the clematis came through in a clutch - it practically glows.

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    1. And another today. It is an oven out there. Please send some of that marine layer to cool us down!

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  4. Some gorgeous blooms, even at such crazy temperatures! It is impressive how quickly some of the dessert plants can bloom, given a little water. What a gorgeous hibiscus! And I love that little orange native flower.

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    1. A friend gave me two cuttings from the hibiscus last fall and they survived to bloom this year. I hope I can keep them going for another year and maybe take some more cuttings.

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  5. I've become a fan of the chocolate daisy too. It never occurred to me that Texas sage would fill some roadsides, but of course it would -- and what a sight it must be. And is there a more photogenic flower than echinopsis?

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    1. I love the morning fragrance of the chocolate daisy. It just fills the air. And yes, the chino-sis is a stunner.

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  6. Thirty-five days of 100 are way too much. I'm surprised anything is blooming in your garden, but I know how skilled you are. Your garden still is so beautiful Jenny. I hope to see it next year at or after Fling.~~Dee

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    1. Looking forward to seeing the flingers here next year and yes, my garden will be on the tour.

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  7. So glad the hibiscus survived your travels this summer! It's amazing how plants spring back with the gift of rain just when they look like they are done for! Thanks for the pretty photos of flowers, I need to see them in this heat!

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    1. The secret to keeping them alive? I took them over to my neighbor while were were gone. Such a pretty little bloom. I need to take some cuttings although I am not sure I will have the success you did.

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  8. The barometer bush, so interesting. I had never heard of it before but enjoyed seeing it bloom. Only the Good Lord could come up with the idea of a plant that would bloom when the air pressure changed.
    Thanks for sharing at GBBD.
    Jeannie @ GetMeToTheCountry.Blogspot.com

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